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In The Kitchen with Bret Thorn
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Chef Kavachi Ukegbu shares her own experiences of having her culture nullified when she was growing up on this week's episode of In the Kitchen.

Kavachi Ukegbu celebrates her Nigerian heritage in Houston and speaks about both the racial and health crisis

The daughter of Safari Restaurant owner Margaret Jason shares her inspiration for educating diners

Listen to this podcast on Apple PodcastsSpotify or SoundCloud.

Kavachi Ukegbu has been working to promote the food of her Nigerian heritage for most of her life. The daughter of chef Margaret Jason, and actively involved in promoting their family restaurant, Safari, Ukegbu also has her own projects, including an educational resource, The Art of Fufu, and Grubido, which works to commercialize international flavors and bring them to the mainstream.

In this podcast, Ukegbu shares her own experiences of having her culture nullified when she was growing up, and how she has learned to celebrate West African staples such as fufu and jollof rice, as well as giant snails, goat head and cow leg, and to teach others to enjoy them, too.

She also discusses the recent demonstrations focused on the Black Lives Matter movement, how they brought her community together, and her hopes that, this time, some real change might come about.

Contact Bret Thorn at [email protected] 

Follow him on Twitter: @foodwriterdiary

 

 

 

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