The Grill bar

Goodbye, Four Seasons. Hello, The Grill.

Long-awaited new restaurant in New York’s Seagram Building opens

With the press declaring it “New York’s most important new restaurant,” The Grill opened in the iconic Seagram Building on Thursday, replacing the legendary Four Seasons restaurant. 

The Grill is designed to recapture the stylish glory days of Manhattan’s midcentury chophouses in a setting that has restored the art and architecture of the landmark space. Retro dishes like steak tartare, filet mignon topped with smoked oysters and an herb-butter sauce, a prime rib trolley and ice cream Charlotte fill the menu.

“We’re proud to say this menu’s a throwback. It reflects hours and hours of research on decades of Manhattan dining culture,” said chef and partner Mario Carbone of the Major Food Group, which has redone the three restaurants in the Seagram Building.

From left to right: Mario Carbone, Jeff Zalaznick and Rich Torrisi

In addition to The Grill, a seafood-focused concept called The Pool is scheduled to debut this summer, with chef and partner Rich Torrisi spearheading the menu. A third concept that has not yet been named will also be added later this year as a late-night destination.

The Grill promises to be “more fun than formal,” according to press materials. But the luxurious restaurant has premium touches throughout, creating a certain “privileged atmosphere,” promoters say, from original art by Joan Miró, Alexander Calder and Cy Twombly, to Tom Ford-designed tuxedos worn by service captains and tableware inspired by the John F. Kennedy White House. 

“This is the greatest restaurant space of all time, and we’re doing everything we can to honor that,” said Jeff Zalaznick, a Major Food Group partner, in a statement. “It’s the opportunity of a lifetime for us as restaurateurs, and it’s explosively exciting for us as New Yorkers.”

Contact Lisa Jennings at [email protected]

Follow her on Twitter: @livetodineout

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